Glossary

Social innovation
refers to new strategies, concepts, ideas and organizations that meet social needs of all kinds - from working conditions and education to community development and health - and that extend and strengthen civil society. The term has overlapping meanings. It can be used to refer to social processes of innovation, such as open source methods and techniques. Alternatively it refers to innovations which have a social purpose - like microcredit or distance learning. The concept can also be related to social entrepreneurship and it also overlaps with innovation in public policy and governance. Social innovation can take place within government, the for-profit sector, the nonprofit sector, or in the spaces between them. Research has focused on the types of platforms needed to facilitate such cross-sector collaborative social innovation.
Source: Wikipedia
German: http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Soziale_Innovation

Social entrepreneurship
is the recognition of a social problem and the uses of entrepreneurial principles to organise, create and manage a social venture to achieve a desired social change. While a business entrepreneur typically measures performance in profit and return, a social entrepreneur also measures positive returns to society. Thus, the main aim of social entrepreneurship is to further broaden social, cultural, and environmental goals. Social entrepreneurs are commonly associated with the voluntary and not-for-profit sectors,[1] but this need not preclude making a profit. Social entrepreneurship practised with a world view or international context is called international social entrepreneurship.
Source: Wikipedia; 1 Lorenz, T. (2012): Social Entrepreneurs at the Base of the Pyramid. Metropolis Verlag. Dissertation
German: http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Social_Entrepreneurship

Corporate social responsibility
(CSR, also called corporate conscience, corporate citizenship, social performance, or sustainable responsible business/ Responsible Business)[1] is a form of corporate self-regulation integrated into a business model. CSR policy functions as a built-in, self-regulating mechanism whereby a business monitors and ensures its active compliance with the spirit of the law, ethical standards, and international norms. The goal of CSR is to embrace responsibility for the company's actions and encourage a positive impact through its activities on the environment, consumers, employees, communities, stakeholders and all other members of the public sphere who may also be considered as stakeholders.
Source: Wikipedia; 1 D Wood, 'Corporate Social Performance Revisited' (1991) 16(4) The Academy of Management Review
German: http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corporate_Social_Responsibility